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Somewhere In Time

Catalog Number
66024
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Primary Distributor (If not listed, select "OTHER")
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VHS | SP | Slipcase
103 mins (NTSC)
N/A | N/A | N/A
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Somewhere In Time (1980)

Additional Information

Additional Information
Some day in the past, he will find her.

Someday in the past he will find her...

Beyond fantasy. Beyond obsession. Beyond time itself... he will find her.

He sacrificed life in the present... to find love in the past.


Christopher Reeve got away from Superman and related costume roles in this dramatic fantasy film, adapted from Richard Matheson's 1960s vintage novel Bid Time Return. A young playwright, Richard Collier (Reeve), is approached by an elderly woman on the occasion of his first triumph in 1972 -- all she says to him is "Come back to me" and leaves him with a watch that contains a picture of a ravishing young woman. Eight years later, he visits the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island and comes upon a photograph of the same woman, whom he discovers was an actress who made an appearance at the hotel in 1912. He becomes obsessed with the image and what the woman -- who died the night she approached him in 1972 -- meant by what she said. In a manner somewhat reminiscent of the film Laura, he falls in love with her and her image as he learns more about her life and career. Then he comes upon the suggestion of a professor at his former college that time travel may, in fact, be possible, using an extreme form of self-hypnosis to free the person from the place they occupy in the time-stream. Collier's feelings for the woman are so strong that he succeeds, bringing himself back to the hotel in 1912 on the eve of her triumph. He meets the actress, Elise McKenna (Jane Seymour), and the two fall in love despite the machinations of her obsessive, autocratic manager (Christopher Plummer), who feels threatened by Collier's presence.


Somewhere in Time is a 1980 romantic science fiction film directed by Jeannot Szwarc. It is a film adaptation of the 1975 novel Bid Time Return by Richard Matheson, who also wrote the screenplay. The film stars Christopher Reeve, Jane Seymour, Christopher Plummer, Teresa Wright, and Bill Erwin.
Reeve plays Richard Collier, a playwright who becomes smitten by a photograph of a young woman at the Grand Hotel. Through self-hypnosis, he travels back in time to the year 1912 to find love with actress Elise McKenna (portrayed by Seymour). But her manager William Fawcett Robinson (portrayed by Plummer) fears that romance will derail her career and resolves to stop him.
The film is known for its musical score composed by John Barry. The 18th variation of Sergei Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini also runs throughout the film.


Although this movie was well received during its previews, it was widely derided by critics upon release and underperformed at the box office. In 2009, in an interview with WGN America, Jane Seymour stated that "[i]t was just a little movie... The Blues Brothers came out the same week and it was a $4 million budget, so Universal didn't really support it. There was also an actors' strike, so Chris [Reeve] and I weren't allowed to publicize it. And they barely put it out because I don't think anyone really believed in it."[3] Seymour's memory, however, is inaccurate: The Blues Brothers was released on June 20, 1980, whilst Somewhere in Time premiered on September 17 and was released on October 3, 1980; it is most likely that the British Seymour has confused the US and UK release dates, with The Blues Brothers debuting in the UK one week after the US release of Somewhere in Time. The budget for Somewhere in Time had originally been set at $8 million, but the studio would only "green light" the picture when the budget was cut by half. It eventually cost $5.1 million. The actors' strike did prevent Reeve and Seymour from promoting the film, as making public appearances to promote a film is considered to be work. No positive buzz about the film was generated and the critics' evaluations were harsh

The film received decidedly mediocre to positive reviews from critics. Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reports that 63% of 16 film critics have given the film a positive review, with a rating average of 5.8 out of 10.[5] Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average score out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, gives the film a score of 29 based on 7 reviews.[6] The film has gone on to become a cult classic.


Release Date: October 3, 1980


Distrib: Universal

Boxoffice: $9,709,597 2013: $29,453,700

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