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Gregory's Girl

Catalog Number
VHS 3005
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VHS | N/A | Slipcase
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Gregory's Girl (1982)

Additional Information

Additional Information
This has to be the match of the day!

What Gregory Doesn't Know About Women Fills A Wonderful New Comedy

... there's a little bit of him in all of us.


The sophomore film of Scottish director Bill Forsyth was his first international hit, a typically quirky comedy set amongst colorful Scottish teenagers. Gregory (John Gordon Sinclair) is a normal, gangly, hormonally-challenged student who, like his pals, has begun to discover the charms of the opposite sex, particularly those of Dorothy (Dee Hepburn), the new girl in school and a talented soccer player. Dorothy joins the team, and Gregory instantly becomes smitten with her. Gregory's affections are a given in spite of the fact that Dorothy is a better player than most of the boys on the hapless team, and her presence inspires a great deal of angst and embarrassment. Gregory is prepared to go to humiliating lengths in order to win Dorothy's attention, but it doesn't quite work out as he anticipates. The winner of a BAFTA Award for Best Screenplay, Gregory's Girl was followed 18 years later by a sequel, Gregory's Two Girls (1999)

Gregory's Girl is a 1981 Scottish coming-of-age romantic comedy film written and directed by Bill Forsyth and starring John Gordon Sinclair, Dee Hepburn and Clare Grogan. The film is set in and around a state secondary school in the Abronhill district of Cumbernauld. Clare Grogan's performance helped promote her career, as she was in the band Altered Images at the time of the film's release.
Gregory's Girl was ranked #30 in the British Film Institute's list of the top 100 British films and #29 on Entertainment Weekly's list of the 50 best high school movies.[2]

Film critic Roger Ebert liked the film's direction, and wrote "Bill Forsyth's Gregory's Girl is a charming, innocent, very funny little movie about the weird kid. ... The movie contains so much wisdom about being alive and teenage and vulnerable that maybe it would even be painful for a teenager to see it. ... Maybe only grown-ups should see this movie. You know, people who have gotten over the pains of unrequited love (hollow laugh)."[7]
The staff at Variety liked the work of the young cast and Forsyth's direction, and wrote, "Filmmaker Bill Forsyth, whose friendly, unmalicious approach recalls that of René Clair, is concerned with young students (in particular, a soccer team goalie, Gregory) seeking out the opposite sex. ... As Gregory, John Gordon Sinclair is adept at physical comedy. Hepburn is properly enigmatic as the object of his desire, with ensemble approach giving Greg's precocious 10-year-old sister played by Allison Forster a key femme role."[8]
Critic Richard Skorman wrote, "Forsyth does a good job of making light of the tender part in [Gregory's] teenage psyche, and his friends and little sister in particular are quirky and lovable. Unlike the film's American counterparts, Gregory's Girl is refreshingly free of mean-spirited characters and horny young studs bemoaning their virginity."[9]
The review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reported that 92% of critics gave the film a positive review, based on thirteen reviews."[10]

Release Date: May27, 1982

Distrib: Samuel Goldwyn Company

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